Dutch told $6 billion climate change plans won't meet goals

Environment


THE HAGUE (Reuters) – Proposals to fight climate change will cost the Netherlands around 5.2 billion euros ($6 billion) over the next decade but will not be enough to meet its emission reduction goals, the government’s top advisory body said on Wednesday.

The Netherlands is one of the most polluting countries in Europe, with higher CO2 emissions per citizen and a lower use of sustainable energy than almost everywhere in the European Union.

The Dutch government is expected to decide by the end of April on what action to take to tackle climate change after a consultation led to a series of measures proposed by businesses, activists and other groups.

Government adviser CPB said these are expected to reduce gross domestic product by around 0.5 percent by 2030, but will most likely not enable the government to meet its target of reducing CO2 emissions by 49 percent in 2030 from 1990 levels.

Dutch CO2 emissions are expected to be 21 percent lower than in 1990 next year, missing the goal of a 25 percent reduction which was ordered by a Dutch court last year.

“These policies could significantly stimulate the energy transition, but a lot still needs to be done”, CPB said of the around 130 measures which were put forward.

These include higher taxes on the use of gas for heating and on airline tickets, subsidies on electrical cars, increased use of wind and solar power, and incentives for industry to cut emissions and homeowners to better insulate their houses.

Of the total cost, around 3.2 billion euros would have to be paid by households, CPB said.

Reporting by Bart Meijer; Editing by Alexander Smith



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